The Ratells/The Lines: Sheffield Academy

New Drama are a fresh-faced 3-piece who look like they’ve brought the rest of Y9 with them. They start with a cover of ‘Ghostbusters’ and rather than it being played ironically, it is just played with a youthful zeal. They played a few more covers and ‘Positivity’ let the drummer show off his new tom toms with a seies of rolls. They aren’t going to set the world alight, but this experience will be invaluable if they continue to play together. They finished with good applause from a decent-sized crowd.

The crowd had swelled further for the arrival of The Legion. They played a set which delighted the testosterone-fuelled crowd and the 2 vocalists regularly exhorted the crowd to “bounce”, which they did with much abandon. The drums were too low in the mix, the twin guitars combined to provide decent riffs and the bass was melodic and tuneful. The Oh Oh Oh vocals and terrace-style choruses whipped the crowd up and gave the security cause for concern.

The Lines have been tipped by Steve Lamacq and Robert Plant and they brought a sizeable following from Wolverhampton who were looking for a good night out (they needed a drink or two after Wolves were caned 4-0 at Chelsea earlier in the day). The first song was inauspicious indie-pop, but the boys in the pit were oblivious, indulging in a beer-throwing contest. The set then developed into a slick stew of atmospheric guitars, danceable rhythms and impassioned vocals. Songs were stripped down to bass and drums, then burst into life with bright, chiming guitars and anthemic choruses. Will they make it? They have as good a chance as anyboby.

I don’t know if The Ratells are in possession of some incriminating photographs of the Counterfeit editor, but this is their third live review in as many months! They are preceeded on stage by an illuminated backdrop instructing the crowd to put their hands together, though the actual words used were a bit more Anglo-Saxon. The beered-up boys at the front sent the young girls scurrying for the sanctuary of the back of the venue with their “enthusiastic dancing”. Everyone had a good time and The Ratells continued their climb up the local popularity ladder.

This Soundclash presentation wasn’t as varied as some of the previous bills, but the packed crowd didn’t mind (the public gets what the public wants, or the public wants what the public gets?) and it certainly kept the bar staff busy.