Adam Green: The Wardrobe, Leeds

As ‘Mirror Kisses’ by The Cribs blared out over the sound system Adam Green and his guitarist, former Moldy Peaches member Toby Goodshank, meandered onto stage to be greeted by a very excitable crowd. The quirky and charismatic frontman drifted towards the microphone dressed like a cross between a dandy pirate and a bus driver in 1950’s America.

From the offset he was eccentric, jovial and quirky. He pranced around with a permanent cheeky grin and a look in his eye reminiscent of Charlie as he gawps in wonder at the inner workings of Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. He was clearly enjoying himself and his offbeat charisma and faux awkwardness really endeared him to the crowd.

He opened this acoustic set with a warm, tender and gentle rendition of ‘Bluebirds’. His flawless voice and alternative crooner style combined with his unusual and playful dancing meant he held the gaze of the audience throughout. His vocal and lyrical tone made me think that somewhere in an alternate universe there is a version of Bright Eyes with a sunny disposition creating exactly this kind of thing.

His loose, yet simultaneously, awkward and random dance moves and statements were almost puppet like. He could easily be the sixth Tracey brother who they kept out of the way in the attic, or Thunderbird six as they called it, as he didn’t fit in with the other clean cut and serious members of the family. He clearly shunned the monotonous tasks they gave him and began to indulge his artistic flair and creativity. He is a maverick in every sense of the word and his character and musical style are incomparable.

The audience clearly comprised of people who had followed him throughout his career and they reveled in his unpredictable nature. During one of his closing numbers ‘Jessica’ his broke into an impromptu acapella version of Springsteen’s ‘Born To Run’.

He ended a warmly received set on ‘Dance With Me’. As the song came to a finish he dived into the crowd who then passes him out towards the back of the standing section before returning him to the stage.